: Oct 22, 2016

While I am sad for the loss of their son, I do feel very uncomfortable with the politicization of the Khan family and their tragedy….

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While I am sad for the loss of their son, I do feel very uncomfortable with the politicization of the Khan family and their tragedy.

Firstly, even as our sympathies are extended to them for the loss of their son, we do need to be firm in our stance, and cannot allow emotions to cloud facts. The invasion of Iraq was a manufactured war based on an intentional lie sold to the American people in order to increase profits for Haliburton, Exxon Mobil, Kellog-Brown-Root, and a small cadre of multibillion dollar companies. Each one of these companies has direct ties to powerful politicians in the top echelons of this government.

Foot soldiers like Mr Khan, Jr. might have had sincere intentions, but that does not change the fact that they were being used as tools by venture capitalists and for-profit politicians who didn’t mind killing millions of humans in order to get rich.

Secondly, the narrative that is being painted is that the only way we will be accepted within the nation-state of America is if we are willing to die for it. And I for one do not want to give my life up to a nebulous and murky cause (such as the invasion of Iraq/Afghanistan, etc.). So if someone opposes such wars and refuses to sacrifice one’s life for them, does that make them any lesser of a citizen?

If that is the case, then I suggest that we make it *mandatory* for the politicians and leaders who vote for war to actually participate in it themselves. Don’t talk to me about my patriotism when you politicians are the greatest cowards and draft-dodgers imaginable!

In any case, share your comments below on how you feel about Clinton using the Khizr family against Trump.

Khizr Khan, father of a fallen Muslim American hero: “I want to ask Mr. Trump: Would my son have a place in your America?”

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