February 2016


PART 6/6 – The Story of Musa and Khidr (peace be upon them)
Take a look at our weekly Surah Al-Kahf in-depth tafsir study. Now available on Bayyinah TV.

Saturday 5th To Sunday 6th March 2016
Jibreel Institute – CILE : Research Center for Islamic Legislation & Ethics Understanding Islamic Ethics: How We Know Right and Wrong

Jibreel Institute – Understanding Islamic Ethics: How We Know Right and Wrong

An exclusive weekend with Prof. Tariq Ramadan UNDERSTANDING ISLAMIC ETHICS: HOW WE KNOW RIGHT AND WRONG In this unique two-day seminar and for the first time in the UK, Prof. Tariq Ramadan exa

هناك ثوابت في الإسلام غير قابلة للتغيير، وبالمقابل هناك بعض المبادئ تتغير بتغير السياق العام، ويجب أن تبقى رهينة بالسياق الزمني حتى تظل وفية للمقاصد الكبرى للشريعة. يعني من الواجب ربط العقل البشري بحركية التاريخ.

Every time I got to a drop of water,
I mistaken it for the ocean.
And then God would teach me.
So I kept walking.
I came across a larger drop.
I mistaken it for the ocean.
Again.
And again He taught me.
To keep going.
Don’t stop.
And don’t give up.
Keep going.
It’s about trust, dear soul.
Trust. And patience.
Not the still kind.
The kind that keeps walking,
Through the storm.
Through the illusion.
Through the mirage.
Through every false door,
And imaginary shelter.
It’s not easy to fall on your face.
But it’s even harder to get back up.
And not just get back up…
Get back up and keep hoping.
That’s hard.
That requires the deepest level of reliance.
And hope.
Beautiful hope.
Bulletproof hope.
Irrational optimism.
Nothing short of it.
Keep going.
Dear beautiful soul,
You almost drowned in drops…
looking for the Sea.
Dear soul, He didn’t let you drown.
You kept going.
Even when you had to crawl.
In the rain.
In the pitch black night.
You kept going.
And He led you, dear soul.
He led you, dear soul.
He led you…
…to the Sea.

Allah kareem.

Some personal thoughts on #OurThreeBoys:

So I’ve been out of country and off of social media for a few days and only became aware of this story today. I’d like to share some reflections after getting somewhat caught up:

1. I understand why some people find the hashtag offensive as “boy” can certainly have a racist connotation. I used it because I’ve seen it being used by Black leadership and hence do not see it being used in the racist context. Had I personally made the hashtag, I probably would have used something else so that it not be ambigous. But since the hashtag has already been made viral and embraced by Black leadership, I think we should stick to it and assume the good of it as opposed to a racist connotation. If the leadership decides to go a different direction on this particular hashtag, then insha’Allah we will follow.

2. Someone actually sent me a screenshot of a tweet that was meant to be critical which basically said that “apparently Arab/Desi Muslims only care about lost lives when Omar Suleiman posts about it.” I actually do understand that sentiment. Muslims need to appreciate, embrace, and follow the phenomenal Black leaders we have in our community especially, but not limited to, on issues pertaining to the African American community as a whole. You should not be waiting for me or anyone else to validate an obvious cause. These lives are just as precious as the lives of our own family members.

3. I see some people calling out the double standard on how we rushed to the hashtag of #OurThreeWinners but dragged our feet with this one. That is also true and I think even their families would agree with that. However, I would like to caution people from unintentionally taking away from that tragedy and possibly even hurting the family while calling out that double standard. Deah, Yusor, and Razan would’ve been amongst the first to post about this cause and any other cause because they were beautiful souls that cared about people in general.

4. I’d just like to remind everyone to be productive with their tweets and posts on this issue. Let’s focus our attention on mainstream media for not covering the killings, demand a thorough investigation from the police department, and of course make Dua for the grieving families. No matter what the motive turns out to be, those families lost their children and need our prayers and support.

Jazakumullah khayr,
Omar

Intelligent Americans who are shocked and surprised at the rise of Donald Trump, a fascist demagogue who appeals to the basest instincts in fundamentalists and fanatics, should now be able to understand the rise of radical religious terrorist movements in the Middle East as well.

If, in light of the paranoia and fear in America, someone like Trump is gaining popularity, imagine a land a million times worse, plagued with civil war and mass migrations and continual genocide and carpet bombs and drones. Is it surprising that radical, messianic, violent groups will arise and even gain a modicum of popularity?

Stop blaming the religion; blame the political situation that caused such sentiments to go mainstream.

The irony is that Trump needs radical terrorism to get elected, and radical terrorists need Trump to gain more recruits. They each feed off of one another and benefit from one another, while the vast majority of people in the middle, Muslim and non-Muslim alike, continue to suffer at the effects of bigots and xenophobes on both sides.

#OurThreeBoys So saddened to hear of the execution style deaths of these young men. No motive is known yet, but 3 lives are lost and families are grieving. The media is of course silent. May Allah make it easy for them and reunite them in paradise. Ameen

Story: http://muslimmatters.org/2016/02/28/3-young-african-muslims-shot-execution-style-many-questions-to-be-answered/

UPDATE:

Some personal thoughts on #OurThreeBoys:
So I’ve been out of country and off of social media for a few days and only became aware of this story today. I’d like to share some reflections after getting somewhat caught up:
1. I understand why some people find the hashtag offensive as “boy” can certainly have a racist connotation. I used it because I’ve seen it being used by Black leadership and hence do not see it being used in the racist context. Had I personally made the hashtag, I probably would have used something else so that it not be ambigous. But since the hashtag has already been made viral and embraced by Black leadership, I think we should stick to it and assume the good of it as opposed to a racist connotation. If the leadership decides to go a different direction on this particular hashtag, then insha’Allah we will follow.
2. Someone actually sent me a screenshot of a tweet that was meant to be critical which basically said that “apparently Arab/Desi Muslims only care about lost lives when Omar Suleiman posts about it.” I actually do understand that sentiment. Muslims need to appreciate, embrace, and follow the phenomenal Black leaders we have in our community especially, but not limited to, on issues pertaining to the African American community as a whole. You should not be waiting for me or anyone else to validate an obvious cause. These lives are just as precious as the lives of our own family members.
3. I see some people calling out the double standard on how we rushed to the hashtag of #OurThreeWinners but dragged our feet with this one. That is also true and I think even their families would agree with that. However, I would like to caution people from unintentionally taking away from that tragedy and possibly even hurting the family while calling out that double standard. Deah, Yusor, and Razan would’ve been amongst the first to post about this cause and any other cause because they were beautiful souls that cared about people in general.
4. I’d just like to remind everyone to be productive with their tweets and posts on this issue. Let’s focus our attention on mainstream media for not covering the killings, demand a thorough investigation from the police department, and of course make Dua for the grieving families. No matter what the motive turns out to be, those families lost their children and need our prayers and support.
Jazakumullah khayr,
Omar

The headline doesn’t mention they are Muslim unless they are the ones doing the shooting. When they are the victims, they are just “3 men killed ‘execution-style’ in abandoned home.”
Disgusting.

Fort Wayne police: 3 men killed ‘execution-style’ in abandoned home

An investigation is underway after three young men were found shot to death “execution-style” in an abandoned home in Indiana, authorities said.

Their love story always blows me away…:

Once, years after Khadijah died, he came across a necklace that she once wore. When he saw it, he remembered her and began to cry and mourn. His love for her never died, so much so, that his later wife A’isha became jealous of her. Once she asked the Prophet (pbuh) if Khadijah had been the only woman worthy of his love. The Prophet (pbuh) replied: “She believed in me when no one else did; she accepted Islam when people rejected me; and she helped and comforted me when there was no one else to lend me a helping hand.”

This. And everything about this! ♡

“They say beauty comes from a spirit that has weathered many hardships in life and somehow continues with resilience. Grace can be found in a soul that ages softly, even amid the tempest.
I think the loveliest by far is the one whose gentle heart bears a hundred scars from caring, yet still finds a way to pick up the lamp, one more time, to light the way for love.”

–Susan Frybort